John Alan Turner

Speaker, Author, Mentor, Coach, Facilitator

Waiting on the World to Change

Me and all my friendsWe're all misunderstood They say we stand for nothing and There's no way we ever could

Now we see everything that's going wrong With the world and those who lead it We just feel like we don't have the means To rise above and beat it

So we keep waiting Waiting on the world to change We keep on waiting Waiting on the world to change

It's hard to beat the system When we're standing at a distance So we keep waiting Waiting on the world to change

Now if we had the power To bring our neighbors home from war They would have never missed a Christmas No more ribbons on their door And when you trust your television What you get is what you got Cause when they own the information, oh They can bend it all they want

That's why we're waiting Waiting on the world to change We keep on waiting Waiting on the world to change

It's not that we don't care, We just know that the fight ain't fair So we keep on waiting Waiting on the world to change

And we're still waiting Waiting on the world to change We keep on waiting waiting on the world to change One day our generation Is gonna rule the population So we keep on waiting Waiting on the world to change

We keep on waiting Waiting on the world to change

-- John Mayer

Before I get into this, I should let you know that I really like John Mayer. I own three of his records ("Continuum", "Heavier Things" and "Room for Squares"). I think he's a really talented guitarist, and I enjoy his lyrics.

But this song, as catchy as it is, reveals something about his thought process that's really disturbing to me. Perhaps it really is the thought process for many of his contemporaries (though I am only seven years older, and it sure doesn't reflect my thoughts).

Maybe I should give some background first. I was an activist when I was in high school and college -- a card-carrying member of Greenpeace, a financial supporter of Amnesty International. I had to be talked out of going to Tiananmen Square to protest the human rights violations going on over there in 1989. I was part of a group of students who got recycling bins on our college campus in the fall of 1988. My friends and I were young and idealistic, and we really believed we could change the world.

I still believe this.

It's why I'm so passionate about helping parents become better parents. It's why I travel so often and so far to help churches become better churches. It's why I write so much to try and help Christians become better Christians. I believe we can change the world. We've done it before, and we can do it again.

But John Mayer and his cronies have given up. They would like things to be different, but they feel powerless to do anything about it. So, they've resigned themselves to wait. They'll continue to complain about things, but they won't try to change anything. Instead, they're waiting on the world to change. Then they'll step in and do something. Or it won't change, but they'll find themselves in charge by default -- with no experience at working for change, just wishing for it.

Anyone else see a problem with that?